The best all-around player in the big leagues first displayed his abilities to a national audience at the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game. So did the Majors’ best pure hitter and most fearsome slugger, not to mention the greatest pitcher of his generation.

Before they became superstars, Mike Trout, Joey Votto, Giancarlo Stanton and Clayton Kershaw were Futures Gamers. Once again, the 20th annual prospect showcase will spotlight some of the most talented players in the Minor Leagues. Twenty-eight of MLB Pipeline’s Top 100 Prospects will take the field at Nationals Park at 4 p.m. ET on Sunday, with the game broadcast live on MLB Network and MLB.com.

The best all-around player in the big leagues first displayed his abilities to a national audience at the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game. So did the Majors’ best pure hitter and most fearsome slugger, not to mention the greatest pitcher of his generation.

Before they became superstars, Mike Trout, Joey Votto, Giancarlo Stanton and Clayton Kershaw were Futures Gamers. Once again, the 20th annual prospect showcase will spotlight some of the most talented players in the Minor Leagues. Twenty-eight of MLB Pipeline’s Top 100 Prospects will take the field at Nationals Park at 4 p.m. ET on Sunday, with the game broadcast live on MLB Network and MLB.com.

:: 2018 Futures Game coverage ::

These are the loudest tools that will be on display:

Best hitter

United States: Keston Hiura, 2B, Brewers
Hiura has done nothing to dispel his reputation as the best hitter available in the 2017 Draft by batting .371 in his pro debut and .302 during his first full season while advancing to Double-A.

World: Luis Urias, 2B/SS, Padres
Urias’ tremendous feel for the barrel as well as the strike zone allowed him to reach Triple-A at age 20, and he’s hitting .278 with a career-high six homers as the Pacific Coast League’s youngest batting qualifier.

Best power

United States: Jo Adell, OF, Angels
Taken one pick after Hiura (10th overall) in the 2017 Draft, Adell led U.S. high schoolers with 25 homers last spring and already has slammed 17 midway through his first full pro season. He has the best all-around tools in the Futures Game, coming in second as the fastest runner, the best defender and the strongest arm on the U.S. squad.

World: Seuly Matias, OF, Royals
Like Adell, Matias is a 19-year-old with electric bat speed, and while he’s still raw at the plate, he tops the Minors with 26 homers.

Video: Top Prospects: Seuly Matias, OF, Royals

Fastest runner

United States: Taylor Trammell, OF, Reds
Georgia’s 2015 Class A football offensive player of the year after rushing for 2,479 yards and 36 touchdowns, Trammell turned down college football opportunities and uses his plus-plus speed on the diamond instead.

World: Luis Garcia, INF, Nationals
The youngest player in high Class A (age 18), Garcia has well above-average speed but is still is learning how to use it on the bases.

Best defender

United States: Ke’Bryan Hayes, 3B, Pirates
His father Charlie played an average third base during 14 season in the Majors, but Ke’Bryan is a better defender and the total package at the hot corner, with range to both sides, soft hands and a strong arm.

Video: Top Prospects: Ke’Bryan Hayes, 3B, Pirates

World: Miguel Amaya, C, Cubs
Extremely advanced for a 19-year-old catcher, Amaya is a quality receiver and framer with a solid arm.

Strongest arm

United States: Ke’Bryan Hayes, 3B, Pirates
Hayes’ arm stands out not only because of its strength, but also because of its accuracy and his ability to make throws from a variety of angles.

World: Francisco Mejia, C, Indians
The only repeater on this list from a year ago, Mejia earns some top-of-the-scale 80 grades for his arm and has erased 35 percent of basestealers this year.

Best fastball

United States: Hunter Greene, RHP, Reds
The No. 2 overall choice in the 2017 Draft, Greene may throw a triple-digits fastball more easily than any pitcher ever, thanks to lightning-fast arm speed and an extremely athletic delivery.

World: Jorge Guzman, RHP, Marlins
Acquired from the Yankees in the offseason Stanton trade, Guzman is in the discussion for the hardest-throwing starter in the Minors with a heater that sits in the upper 90s and climbs as high as 103 mph.

Best curveball

United States: Dylan Cease, RHP, White Sox
Cease has had a devastating curveball since high school and is getting more consistent with a hammer that draws comparisons to Dwight Gooden’s at its best — and he also can hit 100 mph with his fastball.

World: Jesus Luzardo, LHP, Athletics
The fact that Luzardo’s solid curveball is the best on the World team yet pales in comparison to his well-above-average fastball, plus changeup and plus control indicates how lofty his ceiling is.

Video: A’s Luzardo on pitching in upcoming Futures Game

Best slider

United States: Kyle Wright, RHP, Braves
Wright’s mid-80s slider can overpower hitters, and there also are days when it’s his third-best pitch behind his fastball and curveball.

World: Yoan Lopez, RHP, Diamondbacks
Lopez can blow away hitters with a wipeout slider as well as a fastball that touches 99 mph, which is why he has averaged 15.2 strikeouts per nine innings during the past two seasons.

Best changeup

United States: Justus Sheffield, LHP, Yankees
Reportedly made untouchable by the Yankees in trade talks, Sheffield has a solid changeup, a plus slider that rivals Wright’s as the best on the U.S. staff and a 92- to 97-mph fastball.

Video: Top Prospects: Justus Sheffield, LHP, Yankees

World: Jesus Luzardo, LHP, Athletics
Luzardo is having more success against right-handers than left-handers this season, in large part because of his fading and sinking changeup.

Best control

United States: Mitch Keller, RHP, Pirates
Keller commands his 93- to 98-mph fastball to both sides of the plate and down in the strike zone, and he also locates his curveball and changeup well.

World: Jesus Luzardo, LHP, Athletics
With polish to match his stuff, Luzardo is averaging just 2.1 walks per nine innings as a 20-year-old in Double-A.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

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